Holy Apostles Soup Kitchen

Archive for the ‘Soup Kitchen Stories’ Category

Philip

In Soup Kitchen Stories on November 22, 2016 at 7:34 pm

 

philip

On many mornings, Philip will arrive early, bundled up for the cold weather and greeting other guests with a smile and a word of encouragement. A retired Parks and Recreation Director on a limited income, Philip isn’t comfortable just having a meal here without giving back.

“I’ve donated some of my old clothes…things like that,” he explains. “I’ll get a hot meal, and that helps, but a lot of what I am thankful for is the social part,” he explains.

For Philip, this civic minded way of thinking can be traced back to a lifetime of public service and leadership as a Parks and Recreation Director, a youth hockey coach and team sports.

Philip remembers playing baseball in high school so competitively that he was scouted for college teams. “But my mother said no, and I had to respect her wishes,” he says, adding.”I’ve made peace with it. I’ve done other good things with my life that I’m proud of.”

After earning a degree in physical education, Philip enjoyed a productive career with both the New York City and New Rochelle Parks and Recreation departments. His lifetime contribution to the the well-being of countless New Yorkers, from the young athletes he coached to older adults who found happiness and health because of his leadership in their local parks and recreations programs is immeasurable.

“I led my teams to the state championships,” he remembers with pride. “Even when they weren’t expecting to get that far.”

We are seeing more New York retirees like Philip join us regularly for their daily meals. In fact, in our latest survey,  over 14% of guests reported they are over the age of 65, a 4% increase since 2014. Like Philip,  who has contributed so much to society, they too are struggling to make ends meet in New York City on  limited retirement incomes.  Sitting down for a meal alongside the  most vulnerable and homeless New Yorkers, Philip is one of these many senior citizens who are valued members in our community, offering motivation,  hope and wisdom to others.

“The community here means a lot to me,” Philip says. “I like to help out where and when I can.”

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To find out more about how people come together to help hungry and homeless New Yorkers at Holy Apostles Soup Kitchen, log onto our special holiday video on our website at:

http://holyapostlessoupkitchen.org/2016/06/happy-holidays-holy-apostles-soup-kitchen/

 

 

Anthony

In Soup Kitchen Stories, Uncategorized on September 27, 2016 at 2:53 pm

anthony

Two years ago, Anthony was enjoying a successful career in wardrobe, set design and acting for film and tv. Originally from Delaware, where his mother was a college professor of Communications and his father ran a small construction company, Anthony grew up in a loving, comfortable home.  He was encouraged to develop his creativity, work hard and put his best foot forward in everything he did.

Sadly, when he was still a young man, both his parents passed on within a few years of each other and Anthony, with no brothers and sisters to lean on to help, coped with his grief by travelling the world, wanting to experience life to its fullest. Always optimistic, he had faith that between trips he could always find new gigs on tv and film projects.That formula worked for several years before he finally settled down in New York with a long term job on a major television network tv show in New York.

“I lived in an apartment building on the West Side, you know…a doorman,  a nice place, ” he says. “I enjoyed the good things in life: restaurants, travel, nice clothes. I didn’t know what it was like to live without any money.”

So, when the production company went through a reorganization and Anthony lost his job, he was confident he could pick up new work before too long. That was a year and a half ago.  “I thought I’d pick up something new by the end of the month,” he remembers. “Then one month turned into the next, and then the next.”

Never one to give up hope,  Anthony refused to think about the worst case scenario.

But with no income, and no new job prospects in the competitive show business industry, Anthony soon saw his bank account dramatically shrink until he finally had to use his security deposit to pay for a final month on his apartment last June. Since then, he’s been living on the street, homeless, and without family to turn to.

“That first day, when I moved all my things into storage, I looked around and thought – I really don’t have anywhere to go!” he says. “So I started walking, and trying to figure this ‘homelessness thing’ out.”

Anthony’s been putting one step in front of the other ever since. Not feeling safe in the crowded shelter system, he started sleeping on the subway at night, and coming to the soup kitchen during the day for his midday meal.

“If I stay clean and well groomed, and I sit a certain way on the subway  with my briefcase between my feet, I can close my eyes.  I just look like I’m a tired commuter, and I sleep from one end of the line to the other” he says. “By using my old gym membership I can still shower and stay clean. The haircut vouchers from the soup kitchen have really helped.”

At first, he said, it was hard to ask for help. “I always saw people in line here and I was hungry. My pride got in the way though. I kept saying to myself – ‘I don’t want to be in that line’. Next thing you know…I’m in that line!”

He remembers his first impression of the inside of the soup kitchen as he stood with his tray of food, how  it immediately gave him a sense of hope, of peace: “The church is so beautiful!”

Anthony continued to look for work, but when his phone got cut off, he faced an even harder uphill battle to stay on top of his job search.  Excited to find out about our computer lab and resume coaching, he says, “All the people here help so much, they are amazing – the food, the clothing, the soap and toothpaste,  the haircut vouchers. It makes me want to volunteer too. I need to feel productive.”

Anthony’s perseverance, combined with the help from the soup kitchen will hopefully pay off  before the winter months set in. He’s just recently gone to several  job interviews for customer service positions and one job looks especially promising.

“You know, I see this as temporary. It has to be” he says, determination in his voice.  “Some day, I’ll be able to give back a lot to the soup kitchen. You’ll see!”

 

 

Jose

In employment, Keeping hope alive, Soup Kitchen Stories on May 25, 2016 at 2:26 pm

Jose actor

 Twenty six year old Jose’s life has changed in ways he never expected.  Moving from foster home to foster home growing up, Jose never had the safety net of a loving family and has been homeless most of his young adult life. Unable to complete his education due to so many upheavals,  Jose has continued his studies through on-line coursework in writing and acting.  Warding off despair and hopelessness while surfing the web at the library  —  hungry for a meal, a job, a place that would accept him  — Jose found our website and his hope was ignited.

“The first thing I noticed was how calm it is here, how peaceful, how welcoming,” he recalls.  “I can come here and no matter how low I’m feeling, it lifts my spirits.”

Jose has found more than a welcome place for a nutritious meal, he tells us.  After seeing other guests lining up at our social services program in the narthex of the church, he knew he might find some hope for his situation as well. When he told one of our social services advisers about his situation, that it was almost impossible to secure a job without identification and mailing address, he was steered toward one of our most practical programs, a simple photo ID with his name and contact information for verification.  “I was finally able to get an ID and a mailing address here, so I can apply for jobs,” he says.

Carrying a notebook with him that’s filled with a screenplay he’s writing, he was also  excited to find out about our Writers’ Workshop, where he can get feedback on his work , continue learning his craft and meet new friends in our soup kitchen family.

It was finally our clothing pantry that led Jose out of the vicious cycle of homelessness and unemployment. After securing his first audition, he knew he would need appropriate clothing to make that winning first impression. Referring to our Manager of Social Services he says, “Rich hooked me up with a suit, and they said it was perfect for the role!” Today, Jose now has a small role on a major network television program,work experience and, finally,  hope for his future.

 

Volunteer Rick Landman, and the Legacy of CBST

In Soup Kitchen Stories, Uncategorized, Volunteer Stories on April 22, 2016 at 2:18 pm

“Volunteering at Holy Apostles balances me and challenges me.” Rick Landman, soup kitchen volunteer, pictured here with Rev. Glenn Chalmers.

On any Thursday at the soup kitchen, the unmistakable and joyful volunteer presence of Rick Landman cannot be missed. A member of Congregation Beit Simchat Torah, “CBST”, which held Friday night services at the church for many years, Rick has been a vital link that ties  together the history of these organizations sharing the same space. Rick has also been an ambassador of the welcoming  spirit and  legacy of LGBT activism that CBST and Holy Apostles embody.

A fixture in the history of Friday nights at Holy Apostles, CBST is now celebrating its first Passover in its new, permanent home, after moving earlier this month. We said goodbye to their physical presence and wished them well in their new home with a traditional procession that took the congregation through Holy Apostles for a blessing by Reverend Glenn Chalmers, seen here with Rick. We’re grateful to know the congregation is close by, and to know that Rick will still be representing their presence at the soup kitchen.

Rick’s first connection with Holy Apostles was in the early 1970s when the church became a temporary home for many fledgling gay and lesbian organizations following the Stone Wall riots. Among them was CBST – the first New York LGBT synagogue – which Rick came to in 1973. Twenty five years later, Rick was part of the search committee that selected the Church as a more permanent home for CBST’s Friday night Shabbat service.

Thinking back to his return with his congregation to Holy Apostles in 1998, Rick remembers how he didn’t know where he was at first, because of the major renovations after the 1992 fire.

Rick recalls how his perspective changed  when he and his congregation adjusted to holding Shabbat in a church,  “Going to a Church … opened up my perspective to understand how similar Episcopal Christians were to me. I also learned to not only appreciate the space but also the people that I met in the Church.”

It was only a matter of time before he naturally gravitated to the life of the soup kitchen.

“I did volunteer at the soup kitchen for a few Martin Luther King days when I worked full time, but when I retired from NYU in 2007, I started to volunteer every Thursday with the CBST group,” he remembers. Now, after volunteering 1,500 hours over nine years Rick says of the volunteers, guests and staff he has met at the soup kitchen: “They have given me so much love and support.”

The son of  two German Holocaust survivors,  Rick has dedicated his life to education, the law and civil rights. Even with the intergenerational pain from the Holocaust, and the challenge of growing up gay in the 1960’s, the guests’ stories at the soup kitchen often remind Rick of the fortunate circumstances he has been blessed with. “Coming from a rather sheltered life, volunteering at the Holy Apostles balances me and challenges me,” he says.

We’re glad Rick has no plans of retiring his volunteer apron any time soon. “I look forward to my time at the soup kitchen not only to see the staff and volunteers, but I have made many weekly friends of our guests who are helping me with life advice or just schmooze with me.  If I am gone a week, I am surprised when people notice and ask me where I was.”

We will  miss CBST,  and are gratified to know they are just a few blocks away, settling into their new home. And we’re comforted knowing the spirit of that congregation lives on through the dedication that Rick brings to the soup kitchen every Thursday.

Maria’s Story

In Soup Kitchen Stories, Uncategorized on March 22, 2016 at 5:38 pm

 

SK Stories 2016-maria

When 57 year old Maria was in her early twenties she survived a tragedy few can imagine: losing  her parents, her sister and brother to gun violence.

So, after decades of just getting by, carrying the burden of trauma and grief, her recent job loss from an Atlantic City Casino came as just another small hurdle get over, “You know, these things happen. You just have to figure out what’s next,” she says, brightly. Moving back to Queens, where she’d spent a majority of her life, she enrolled in a Back-to-Work program that’s located near the soup kitchen.

“I heard you could get a meal here,” she says, “So I stopped in after the program one day and I’ve been coming here since.”

For Maria, who has no savings, getting to and from the Back-to-Work program is expensive, but, she said, the hot meals from our kitchen and the MetroCards from our social services program make the daily commute much more manageable.

“The volunteers are always so compassionate, and I know I can get at least one good meal every day.It’s always a full meal, and very healthy, and  I do love getting to have a cup of coffee before my ride back home,” she says, relaxing for a few minutes with her hands wrapped around a warm cup.

The impact of the tragedy Maria survived  has of course made an indelible print on her life but despite all the trauma she endured, Maria  somehow chose early on to keep her feet on the ground, and live life with gratitude and dignity.

“I’ve always had to get by on my own wits, and not rely on anyone else,” she says, “but the people here are so kind, they really want to help – and I can’t tell you much that makes  me feel very, very blessed.”

 

Travis’s Story

In employment, Food, Guest stories, Soup Kitchen Stories, Volunteer Stories on December 29, 2015 at 7:26 pm

Travis chopping food 2

Recently unemployed and homeless, Travis moved to New York to look for new opportunities. He’s come a long way since living on a reservation with his former wife in Arizona, before their divorce forced him back east where he lived  with his father in Tennessee for many years.

“I learned on the reservation how important it is to take care of others, especially your elders,” Travis recalls.

Now at age 45, Travis has a wealth of work history in auto mechanics, welding, forklift operation, cab driving and bartending. But at about the same time that he lost his job as a forklift operator in a warehouse last year, his father decided to retire in Illinois, moving to a rural area with few job possibilities for Travis.  When looking at his options, his work history and his dream of studying culinary arts,  it seemed to Travis that he would have a better chance of making a living and pursuing his goals in New York than anywhere else.

Without a job to start off with however, Travis quickly ran out of money and found himself homeless and hungry. He found a local shelter where he can sleep, and it was there that his roommate told him he could find a hot meal at Holy Apostles Soup Kitchen.

But Travis didn’t want to just come here for a meal. “I want to earn my keep,” he says, pointing at the pounds of Plantains in front of him. Several mornings a week now, Travis is one of the first volunteers to arrive, and he gets right to work chopping vegetables and fruit in the kitchen, preparing food that will be served to about a thousand guests between 10:30 and 12:30. “This gives me the chance to learn a little bit about the culinary trade, and be able to eat.”  After all the guests have had their meal, Travis joins the other volunteers for lunch, a meal that gives him the strength to continue his job search and pursue his dreams.

“I like to serve,” Travis says. “It’s what I do.”

Volunteer Story: Boris

In Friendship, Love, Soup Kitchen Stories, Volunteer Stories on December 14, 2015 at 1:57 pm

Boris  judi KAt 71 and living with Alzheimers, Boris has been part of the fabric of the soup kitchen for
many years.

He and his wife Judi are generous donors, and Judi fondly remembers Boris volunteering on holidays as far back as 1989.

“When he retired six years ago, and before his diagnosis, he decided to volunteer here every weekday,” she says. Judi worked beside her husband in their jewelry company for decades, and continues the family tradition with her own jewelry design company now.

“Boris was well loved and respected in the industry,” she states, recalling his years of building up a successful business after moving to Manhattan from Europe. Judi, a graduate of nearby F.I.T., met Boris through his uncle, a colleague of hers in the apparel business.

Now, Judi’s  grateful for the soup kitchen’s role in Boris’s life. “The progression has been slow, yet he can still do so much, and you give him things to do. He never wants to miss a day of volunteering. For him, it’s a purpose, this is his work.”

Boris enjoys getting the silverware and napkins ready for our daily meal where he’s often engaged in lively conversation with other volunteers, helps new volunteers with their aprons, and delivers drinks to the pianist of the day. “I just want him to be happy and get to do as much as he can do,” Judy adds, thankful the staff has become like a second family to Boris, and will call her if we have any concerns.

Charlese’s Story

In Guest stories, Keeping hope alive, Soup Kitchen Stories, The worst of times, Uncategorized on December 7, 2015 at 2:11 pm

Stories -charlese

Homelessness can happen to anyone. Just ask 64 year old Charlese, who lived in the same Upper West Side apartment for almost 40 years, since before her marriage. Her husband owned a beauty salon which Charlese become the manager of, a position she held for 24 years. But when their marriage broke down, Charlese lost her job as well.

“Because I was his wife, I wasn’t able to get any unemployment benefits,” Charlese explains. “He moved out and I wasn’t able to manage the rent alone.

Just as Charlese was forced to tap into her life savings, a new landlord increased her rent dramatically. Her only living family was her elderly father, too frail to support her. Without any income, Charlese was evicted in August, 2013 after she had depleted all her life savings.  Then next thing she knew, she found herself homeless, afraid and alone, sleeping in the Amtrak waiting room at Penn Station, or riding the subway. Without anyone else to turn to, she turned to the soup kitchen. She smiles as she recalls her first meal here.

“I remember the first day I came here.  I felt so peaceful, I felt at home.”

Charlese has spent many days here, even during her father’s illness, when she cared for him despite her own challenges. She’s come here to grieve his recent passing and she lights up when she talks about him.”He was a veteran and a boxer – he taught me how to fight, in every sense of the word.”

Fighting is what Charlese is doing—to stay sane … to stay safe … and to get her life back. This spring she shared her story of homelessness and the hope she found at the soup kitchen at the annual spring fundraiser, From Farm to Tray. “I’m so grateful to everyone, especially the social services staff members who have given me hope at times when I literally felt like I couldn’t go on.”

Today, Charlese has secured a part time job at a call center and lives frugally with a friend to whom she pays rent. While she struggles to  to cover all of her expenses on low wages, she’s determined to never have to rely on a shelter. She says simply, “The food here and the community here has helped me preserve my dignity and spirit.”

 

 

Volunteer Story: Bill

In Soup Kitchen Stories, Volunteer Stories on October 16, 2015 at 8:29 pm

Bill Frick quoteWhen Bill retired six years ago, he knew he wanted to stay busy and keep a sense of purpose in his life.  After a full professional life as a massage therapist and vocational counselor, he decided to go to a volunteer fair to see what options were available to keep his days  meaningful. It was there that he  was introduced to Holy Apostles Soup Kitchen where he’s become a familiar face ever since.

“I signed up for volunteering here, and I’ve never needed to volunteer any where else,” Bill remarks, “There’s something for everybody here. At first I volunteered  five days a week, doing different things. When I started, I usually had the job of carrying the trays back to the kitchen.”

These days, even though he’s volunteering, “only two or three days a week”, Bill’s one of the first volunteers here on those mornings. That’s because as an Assistant Volunteer Coordinator, his job is to welcome the approximately sixty others volunteers, introduce new ones to the soup kitchen, and assign each of them one of the many jobs that’s essential to making the two hour meal  run smoothly. His experience volunteering in many of the roles at the soup kitchen, combined with his experience as a vocational counselor seems makes Bill a natural at this job, ensuring that ensure  that each assignment  matches and accommodates each volunteer’s unique needs and skills.

“It’s a privilege to be here,” Bill says, “I like helping to welcome volunteers and make them feel comfortable.”

Holy Apostles Soup Kitchen has become the  bedrock in Bill’s day to life and his consistent presence helps not only our volunteers feel comfortable, but gives our guests that sense of community and stability  it can be so hard to find elsewhere in their lives.

“It’s a great social place for me, that’s important,” Bill remarks. “The other volunteers are important to me, socially. They’ve become my friends. And you know there are guests who start to volunteer. That’s always great to see happen.”

Londy’s Story

In Guest stories, Keeping hope alive, Soup Kitchen Stories on August 27, 2015 at 3:25 pm

 

 

LondyFFTS

When thirty two year old Londy and her twelve year old daughter first came to Holy Apostles Soup Kitchen two years ago, they were not only hungry for a meal, they were also fleeing a dangerous domestic violence situation. For Londy, the prospect of homelessness was safer than  the constant threat of physical abuse.

And with no family in the area for support, Holy Apostles Soup Kitchen soon became a place she and her daughter could find the routine of regular meals, a safe community and, even, tradition.  “I love the little things they do here, especially on the holidays,” she said, “It really means a lot – to be able to have a place to celebrate whatever holiday is going on. ”

It’s taken courage for  Londy to trust  people again, after living under chronic fear for so long. She’s been enduring unpredictable and temporary living arrangements while seeking out housing that’s truly safe and permanent. “I live in a shelter so the soup kitchen is really comforting,”  she says, adding how much she found comfort by talking with one of the clergy members one day, and how the social services program has helped her navigate resources to help her cope.

“I was doing really bad,” Londy recalls. “And the people  helped me with clothing, and resources like shelter referrals, so I could find ways to survive.”

While she tells her story, Londy  pauses to say hello to another guest and then remarks, “Everyone – their whole demeanor, is really nice here. It helps.”

Today, Londy’s hopeful that her section 8 housing application will be approved before the winter sets in. While she must contend with the stress of waiting for that outcome, she’s gained enough trust in others again to meet with  both the chiropractor and  energy healer who volunteer their time at the soup kitchen  every week.

“I’ve got really bad back problems from not sleeping well, and the chiropractor really helps,” she says. “And I feel so light after meeting with the energy healer, it was amazing!”